The Conjuring 2: Strange Happenings in Enfield Featurette

The supernatural thriller brings to the screen another real case from the files of renowned demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren. Reprising their roles, Oscar nominee Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson star as Lorraine and Ed Warren, who, in one of their most terrifying paranormal investigations, travel to north London to help a single mother raising four children alone in a house plagued by malicious spirits. The Conjuring 2 in theaters June 10, 2016.

The Conjuring 2 | Official Trailer Teaser

The supernatural thriller brings to the screen another real case from the files of renowned demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren. Reprising their roles, Oscar nominee Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson star as Lorraine and Ed Warren, who, in one of their most terrifying paranormal investigations, travel to north London to help a single mother raising four children alone in a house plagued by malicious spirits. The Conjuring 2 in theaters June 10, 2016. Visite the official site here.

‘Bates Motel’ Season 4 Spoilers

‘Bates Motel’ Season 4 Spoilers: Is Vera Farmiga’s Norma Getting A New Love Interest?

Sorry, Normero shippers, but it seems that Norma (Vera Farmiga) is getting a new love interest in season 4 of “Bates Motel.”

TVLine was first to report the speculation along with the news that the A&E drama-thriller is casting the recurring role of Gregg Edwards, a “compassionate, grounded and empathetic” doctor at Pineview Mental Institution in his 40s who “walks a fine line between professional curiosity and personal investment in his patients’ lives.”

Whether or not Gregg ends up as a new love interest for Norman’s (Freddie Highmore) mom, fans who ship Norma and Sheriff Romero (Nestor Carbonell) together won’t be disappointed, as series executive producer Carlton Cuse previously suggested that the pair will eventually become a couple.

“Our intention is to make people want them to get together,” Cuse said of Norma and Romero in an interview with Yahoo TV in April. “When that might happen, [fellow executive producer] Kerry [Ehrin] and I wouldn’t want to say right now, but that’s exactly what you should be feeling. You should be wanting them to get together.”

“We feel like we have an epic couple with Norma and Romero. We plan to deliver on the promise of that at some point, in some form,” he added.

And that seems to be the case, as viewers saw Romero killed Bob Paris (Kevin Rahm) in the season 3 finale not because he will personally benefit from his death, but because he’s protecting Norma, whom he has already fallen for.

“It is the first time he’s committed a crime where his motivation was murky,” Ehrin told TV Guide of the sheriff in May.”He always, in the past, knew exactly why he was doing something and he was doing it to control a bad situation from getting out of hand. This is the first time he has done something purely personal, and he did it because he’s in love with her.”

Do you want to see Norma and Romero become a couple next season? Take our poll, and let us know what you think of the new potential love interest for Norma.

Source: Design & Trend

The Conjuring 2 begins production

Conjuring 2 with Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson begins production

The long-awaited sequel to “The Conjuring” has now started principal photography in Los Angeles. New Line Cinema has confirmed that “The Conjuring 2,” with James Wan (“Furious 7”) once again at the helm, is setting up shop and ready to begin filming this week.

The new film will be a sequel to the box-office hit “The Conjuring,” the supernatural thriller will once again follow another real case from the files of renowned demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren.

Reprising their roles, Oscar nominee Vera Farmiga (“Up In the Air,” TV’s “Bates Motel”) and Patrick Wilson (the “Insidious” films), star as Lorraine and Ed Warren, who, in one of their most terrifying paranormal investigations, travel to north London to help a single mother raising four children alone in a house plagued by malicious spirits.

The film follows the phenomenal worldwide reception of Wan’s “The Conjuring,” which marked the largest opening ever for an original horror movie. The film went on to make more than $319 million worldwide and still remains the second highest grossing original horror movie of all time, second only to “The Exorcist.”

Rounding out the cast are Frances O’Connor (TV’s “The Missing”) as the single mom, with Madison Wolfe (TV’s “Zoo”) and newcomers Lauren Esposito, Patrick McAuley and Benjamin Haigh as her children; Maria Doyle Kennedy (TV’s “Orphan Black”); Simon Delaney (TV’s “Roy”); Franka Potente (TV’s “The Bridge”); and Simon McBurney (“Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation”).

In addition to directing the film, Wan wrote the screenplay with Carey Hayes & Chad Hayes, and David Leslie Johnson. Peter Safran, Wan and Rob Cowan, who previously collaborated on “The Conjuring,” are producing.

Collaborating with Wan behind-the-scenes is Oscar-nominated director of photography Don Burgess (“Forrest Gump,” “42”). Reuniting with the director from “The Conjuring” are production designer Julie Berghoff, editor Kirk Morri, costume designer Kristin Burke, and composer Joseph Bishara.

Scheduled for release on June 10, 2016, “The Conjuring 2” is a New Line Cinema presentation and will be distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.

Source: The Slanted

Relationship with her on-screen son Norman in Bates Motel

Vera Farmiga has a complex relationship with her on-screen son Norman in Bates Motel

In Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 masterpiece Psycho we met the infamous Norman Bates, oppressed son, psychopath and serial killer. In 2013, the television prequel, Bates Motel, constructed around Bates’ early life, and in particular his mother, Norma (Vera Farmiga), a woman hitherto met as a skeleton in the attic, but now in the full bloom of her life.

That relationship – a mother’s obsessive love for her son, and a son’s love/hate relationship with his mother – forms the psychological spine of Bates Motel.

Farmiga describes it as a swinging pendulum, stretching from an almost uncomfortable affection, to a powerful sense of betrayal.

“Norman is at that very precarious stage of adolescence where he’s figuring out what it is to become a man,” Farmiga says. “And he’s being raised by a single mother. There’s a draw to his mother, but a simultaneous [push away]. And I think what you’re going to be seeing is quite a bit of that.

“You’re going to see the most extreme closeness and tenderness, to the point of such uncomfortable closeness between them, and then, sort of, the opposite pendulum swing of complete almost alienation and betrayal.
“But I think [also] they’re just trying to find their footing.”

Our conversation touches on a range of emotions, and Farmiga uses words like “inevitable” and “demise”. To some extent, history is written for both Norma and Norman; the events of Hitchcock’s original film serve as a sort of epilogue to Bates Motel. Though Farmiga does not feel hemmed in by the fate demanded by the larger historical work.

“I don’t get trapped in that … my only mission is to have you guys, the audience, whoever is receiving our story, to really root for them both,” Farmiga says. “The task at hand for me really is to present to you a mother in all her righteousness and her manipulation.”

And to that end, Farmiga believes Norma is a committed mother, even if the fine print of the story suggests otherwise. “Everything that she thinks she is doing, is saying, [is] I’m doing the best that I can to make my son better, to fix him. And, you know, she comes from the heart in what she thinks is the right thing to do.

“She’s this, you know, mother lion.”

Bates Motel also makes rather ambitious observations about the modern world; Farmiga sees it as a work which explores the struggle of parents with their children, where responsibility sits, and how children are fashioned into adults.

“What is so vital about our story I think, especially now in the age of Dylan Klebold​ [who, with Eric Harris, killed 13 people and injured 24 others, in the Columbine High School massacre], is that we, as parents, are really struggling with our children,” Farmiga says.

“They’re growing up in such a violent world, and such a dark place. And I think this is a show that really considers your responsibility as a parent and, in that examination of parent/children relationships, how we, in fact, are responsible, somewhat.

“There’s biochemistry, there’s a neat personality, but then there’s, you know, how do we sculpt them, how do we mould them, do we hurt them, do we help them, how do we make our kids better, how do we prepare them, how do we hone them, how do we love them into the best possible version of themselves.”

The show’s second season also saw the arrival of Caleb Calhoun, played by Kenny Johnson. Calhoun, who is Norma’s estranged older brother, was part of her violent upbringing, a context which exposed a different aspect of Norma’s personality.

Johnson, Farmiga says, is a “one in a million”. “I think it’s very tricky to do what is demanded of him in this role. He can make you feel such great empathy for the character. I think this is what’s so masterful about [Bates Motel] is that we tread these really murky lines where you teeter over a little bit in this area, and it’s just profane.

“The balancing act is quite tricky, tonally, to achieve, because you want to hate Caleb, you want to judge him, and yet he’s quite loveable in this. It’s really odd, but fascinating to watch.”

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald Australia